Demo: fiddlers’ warm-up; common double stops | Bowing Down Home

Transcript

File: toolestephen-oh-takingsound_M.mp3


Speakers:

ST – Stephen Toole

KP – Curator Ken Perlman


ST And another thing about a fiddler is – I've heard my father sayin, I've heard a lot of people sayin that they can always tell a person that would never be a fiddler by the sound they take of the fiddle. And you've got to be able to ‑ The old people used to say that if you couldn't take the right sound out of a fiddle, you'd never be a fiddler. Every fiddler will go over the strings, for example, and everybody has their own sound. This is probably the G.


Taking Sound Out of the Fiddle in G



ST: That's the G chord [key of G] when you sound.



Taking Sound Out of the Fiddle in D


ST: That's the D chord.



Taking Sound Out of the Fiddle in A



ST: That's your A chord. It's just something like that that you take a sound out of your fiddle when you're – But the old people said that you had to be able to take a sound out of it and a musical sound out of your fiddle, ‘fore they could judge whether he was going to make a fiddler or not. For instance, there's the G chord.


Taking Sound Out of the Fiddle in G



ST: That's your G chord. Now, that's the sound I take out of it. Maybe another fiddler would take a different sound. And a D chord.



Taking Sound Out of the Fiddle in D



ST: That's the sound of them chords.And mostly any fiddler that you see, if he starts to play when he picks up his fiddle, he'll probably sound a few chords.


KP Yes, he will, actually. Someone told me it was a signal to the accompanist what chord he was going to go to.


ST Yeah, right.


KP Is that what it is? Or is it something else?


ST Well, no. Yeah, it could be both, you know.